IWCS Professional Development Program

This year, a variety of strong Professional Development Courses will be offered, providing a great learning opportunity from renowned industry experts. These Professional Development / Training courses constitute an industry-recognized certification program.

The Professional Development Courses will commence on Sunday, October 14, 2018 at 8:00am with four concurrent sessions. Four more concurrent sessions will continue at 1:00pm. The Courses will conclude prior to the opening of the IWCS Technical Symposium, allowing attendees to participate both in the Courses and each aspect of the Symposium. Lunch will be provided to registrants of the Courses on Sunday.

Core Courses

IWCS will present the annual core courses of Copper 101, Fiber 101, Materials 101 and Extrusion 101. The four core courses will provide those new to our cable & connectivity industry with basic technology information. Participants have the opportunity to achieve a certificate of recognition for completing each of the core courses.

Elective Courses

Additional Elective courses are selected from a series of emerging technologies and practices. The four elective courses will deliver current, leading edge topics geared at providing information on new areas of interest to engineers, scientists and other cable & connectivity professionals.

Professional Development Certificates and Achievement Plaques

Attendance certificates will be given to students attending any of the courses. Over time, students completing the 4 Core courses, along with two electives, will be presented with an IWCS Professional Development achievement plaque.

IWCSProfDevelCert

 

2018 Course Descriptions (PDF)

 

corecourse

2018 CORE COURSES

 

CU101: FUNDAMENTALS OF COPPER CONDUCTORS & METALLIC CABLE DESIGN & APPLICATIONS

Instructors:
Trent Hayes, Engineering Director, CommScope Incorporated, Claremont, NC, USA
Larry Bleich, Engineering Director, CommScope Incorporated, Catawba, NC, USA

Description
This course is an introduction to the design and application of copper conductor communications cables. Students will understand how coaxial, twisted pair and twin axial cables are designed and how they operate upon completing the class. The instructors will provide background material on the history of copper cabling followed by sections on applications, design and construction of cables. Current standards and design examples are also reviewed by the instructors. Materials that are typically used in copper conductor communication cables will be incorporated at a fairly high level into the design exercises.

Industry professionals desiring a basic knowledge of copper cabling systems will find the course of value.

 

FO101: FUNDAMENTALS OF OPTICAL FIBERS & FO CABLE DESIGN & APPLICATION

Instructor:
David A. Seddon, Senior Engineering Associate, Cable Technology, Corning Optical Communications, Hickory, NC, USA

Description
This course will explore several aspects of optical fiber and cable design technology with particular focus on products for communications. It will discuss application considerations to select a product appropriate for a given installation environment and the basic considerations necessary for successful design of optical fiber cables.

The first part of this course will outline the characteristics and fundamental operating principles of optical fibers and the key differences between Single-Mode and Multimode optical fibers. Included will be critical fiber parameters and their impact on system performance. Specific topics will include the Advantages of Optical Fiber, Optical Fiber Manufacturing, Total Internal Reflection, Attenuation, Dispersion, Polarization Mode Dispersion (PMD), Cutoff Wavelength and other optical parameters critical to optical communications.

The second part of this course will explore the functional requirements of optical fiber cables and some of the fundamental design equations which can be used to ensure a cable will meet a given installation or operational requirement. The course will also discuss selection of a product appropriate for a given installation environment. Structural differences between cables for indoor, outdoor, and specialty applications will be explored including stranded loose tube cables, central and stranded tube ribbon cables, tight buffered cables and optical power ground wire cables.

The course provides a basic overview of optical fiber fundamentals and optical cable design principles to those new to the fiber optic cables

 

MA101: SELECTION & USE OF MATERIALS IN WIRE & CABLE

Instructors:
Dr. Mohamed Esseghir, Principal Research Scientist, The Dow Chemical Company, Collegeville, PA, USA
Mr. Theo Geussens, Application Technology Leader - Telecom, The Dow Chemical Company, Collegeville, PA, USA
Dr. Manish Mundra,Research Scientist, The Dow Chemical Company, Collegeville, PA, USA

Description
In this course, the selection and implementation of polymer materials used in the construction of wires and cables will be reviewed. The course will focus on polymer materials utilized in telecommunication cable applications with focus on twisted pair, coaxial, and fiber optic cables. An overview of the materials science essential to the polymer properties and additives employed in cable compounds will be covered to level-set all attendees. Further, the fundamental characteristics (advantages and disadvantages) of materials will be presented which can be then considered in selecting a material for use in a finished cable construction, with specific sections covering jackets, insulations and fiber optic materials. In addition, the effect of additives on material performance will also be discussed, particularly those that impart ultraviolet resistant and flame retardant properties on the materials.

The course is intended for all wire and cable practitioners including raw material suppliers, cable manufacturers, and end users interested in gaining a broad understanding of applied material selection as it relates to cable performance.

 

EX101: THE ART AND SCIENCE OF EXTRUSION MACHINERY FOR WIRE AND CABLE

Instructor:
Dr. Stéphan Puissant, Process Manager, Maillefer SA, Switzerland

Description
The complete extrusion process is complex and involves a lot of machines having each a different function. The heart of the process being extrusion, we focus in this course on the extrusion group, i.e. extruder and cross head (distributor and tooling).

The single screw extruder seems to be a very simple machine. However, the extrusion process is complex as it is governed by interacting laws from different mechanical engineering fields i.e., thermodynamics, flow mechanics, properties of solid and molten polymers etc. Therefore, in a first step, the physical characteristics (viscosity, conductivity, melting) of polymers used in extrusion are presented. These properties will be the keys to understand the functioning of the thermoplastics extrusion process.

The material basis being covered, the focus will shift on the functioning of the single screw extruder. There the 3 functional zones of the extruder are introduced. For each zone, we will see its functioning in relation to material properties. This mechanism having been described, we will obtain some hints of the optimal screw designs (for some broader plastic families!), so as solutions which may be used to solve problematic issues.

After being plastified (molten), the polymer will be formed in its final shape by some extrusion head. In this part of the course, the basics of distributor design according to the materials are presented. After discussing the effects of distributor geometries, we will also compare different tool designs. And the influence of temperature settings on concentricity, adhesion and surface quality will be shown.

For each of the different items (extruder, X-head, even cooling) evoked in the course, we will try to give some practical hints in relation with a more theoretical approach.

This course is intended for people involved in extrusion and who want a basic analysis tool for identifying potential machinery bottlenecks due to the extrusion group, so as to solve some issues which are hampering the productivity and quality.

 

2018 ELECTIVE COURSES

 

MA210: FLUOROPOLYMERS: AN INTRODUCTION AND GUIDE TO SELECTING MATERIALS FOR WIRE AND CABLE AS WELL AS PROCESSING GUIDELINES

Instructor:
Lensey H. Smith, PhD, Sr. Applications Scientist, Daikin America, Inc., Decatur, AL, USA

Description
This is an introductory course on fluoropolymers, selection, and use in the wire and cable industry. The participants will gain knowledge on the types of fluoropolymers available today for a variety of wire applications including primary insulation and jacketing for areas including telecommunications and co-axial. The course will provide a comparative analysis of properties to assist in making informed decisions on the selection of the right fluoropolymer for the participants’ application. The final portion of the course will review the processing of fluoropolymers including safety, handling, and troubleshooting during the extrusion process.

This course will be useful for all professionals utilizing fluoropolymers in the wire and cable industry. It is also beneficial to those working in material procurement who are seeking further knowledge with respect to raw materials.

 

FO209: THE RELIABILITY OF OPTICAL FIBERS AND PASSIVE FIBER COMPONENTS IN LONG AND SHORT COMMUNICATION NETWORKS

Instructor:
Tarja Volotinen, Expert, Tarja’s Consulting AB, Hudiksvall, Sweden

Description
The mechanical and optical reliability during the past over 35 years in service are overviewed for optical fibers, splices and passive fiber components. The failure mechanisms that are possible in fibers, and also the methods how they can be decreased or avoided in the networks are presented.

The reliability requirements and survival estimates for communications links, ranging from the thousands of kilometers overseas connections to the short, a-few-meters – hundreds-of-meters datacenter and cloud networks are described. The physical and chemical conditions that the fiber materials and cable structures need to withstand are also described.

The lifetime calculation method (IEC TR62048) and the test methods (according to the relevant FOTPs, IEC and other standards) to characterize the mechanical properties of the fibers and components are described in detail. Special care is used to understand the strength of the high strength parts and weak spots of optical fibers, and how the test data needs to be analyzed for the lifetime and failure rate estimation in different networks and service environments (chemical and physical).

Furthermore, this course also presents the optical and mechanical worst case failure modes (e.g. attenuation increase, hydrogen aging and fiber glass surface corrosion etc.) that might occur in the case unsuitable materials and manufacturing methods are used. Finally, the typical reliability of fibers in appropriate cable networks, which now provide us all the broad band communication worldwide are presented. – The course is based on the literature data.

This course is designed for engineers of manufacturers, network and system designers and operators.

 

FO210: INTRODUCTION TO FIBER OPTICS AND TESTING – BEST PRACTICES

Instructor:
Mark Kazes, RCDD; Light Brigade, Tukwila, WA, USA

Description
This course will start with a review of fiber optic communications – how and why fiber is used. We will discuss passive components used in multimode and single-mode fiber optic networks, including fiber, cable, connectors and hardware as well as typical topologies.

Much of the class will discuss test equipment and testing best practices for verifying proper installation as well as for troubleshooting. We will review optical loss test sets and certification testing, along with the different requirements for SM and MM. Proper cleaning and inspection of connectors and test ports will be reviewed. Review of OTDR testing – from how it works to proper settings to review of various events commonly seen in OTDR traces. Finally, we will take a look at other useful equipment like visual fault locators and optical fiber identifiers – how and when to use these.

This course will provide a basic understanding for anyone involved in installing, testing, troubleshooting or managing fiber optic links. It would also be useful for anyone working in the industry who wants a fiber overview or better understanding of the field testing aspects of the business.

 

CU202: COPPER CABLING TECHNOLOGY – ADVANCED TRANSMISSION LINE THEORY AND MEASUREMENTS

Instructors:
Professor Alistair Duffy, Faculty of Technology, De Montfort University, Leicester, United Kingdom
Kenneth Cornelison, Wire & Cable Technology Resources, Cincinnati, OH, USA

Description
This course reviews the fundamental transmission line theory inherent in all cables, relating the electrical property fundamentals to the transmission in high performance cables. Basic building blocks of electrically long transmission lines are described, and how they relate to modern cable design.

The course also covers the testing technology for high frequency cables. Measurement procedures, principles and techniques are covered, highlighting areas important for the latest cable types. Operation of test equipment such as vector network analyzers is reviewed, and the different methods of operation for laboratory and field test equipment. The course will briefly touch on some of the trends in cable applications and design that are influencing measurement technology and techniques.

The course ranges from fundamental theory to practical application.